Judge Andrew Napolitano: DACA and the rule of law | Fox News

Judge Andrew Napolitano: DACA and the rule of law | Fox News

Thursday, September 7, 2017

10:49 AM

Earlier this week, Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced that in six months, the Department of Justice will begin the long process for deportation proceedings against 800,000 young people who came to America as babies and young children in the care of their parents and others because those entries into this country were and remain unlawful.

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When President Obama signed numerous executive orders attempting to set forth the conditions under which illegally immigrated adults whose children were born here could lawfully remain here, he was challenged in federal court and he lost.

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Sessions believes that the government would lose again if it declined to deport those who came here illegally as babies and young children.

Here is the back story.

Shortly after President Obama formalized two programs, Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (commonly known as DACA) and Deferred Action for Parents of Americans (commonly, DAPA), in a series of executive orders, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 5th Circuit ruled that DAPA — the orders protecting undocumented immigrants who are the parents of children born here — was unconstitutional.

Before signing his executive orders, Obama tried to persuade Congress to amend federal immigration laws so as to permit those who came here illegally and bore children here and those who came here illegally as infants to remain here with work permits, high school diplomas, Social Security numbers, jobs and other indicia of stability and permanence. After Congress declined to vote on the Obama proposals, he authored his now-famous DACA and DAPA executive orders. He basically decided to do on his own what Congress had declined to do legislatively.

But Obama’s executive orders were not novel; they merely formalized what every president since Ronald Reagan — including President Donald Trump — has effectively done. Each has declined to deport undocumented immigrants who bore children here or who were brought here as young children. President Obama alone showed the courage to put this in writing, thereby giving immigrants notice of what they need to do to avoid deportation and the government notice of whose deportations should not occur.

Numerous states challenged Obama’s DAPA orders in federal court. The states argued that because they are required to provide a social safety net — hospital emergency rooms, public schools, financial assistance for the poor, etc. — for everyone within their borders, whether there lawfully or unlawfully, DAPA was increasing their financial burden beyond their ability or will to pay. Stated differently, they argued that the president alone was effectively compelling these states to spend state tax dollars against the will of elected state officials. The states also argued that DAPA was such a substantial deviation from the immigration statutes that Congress had written that it amounted to the president’s rewriting the law and thereby usurping the constitutional powers of Congress.

A federal district judge agreed with the states, and the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 5th Circuit affirmed that ruling. That court held that by increasing the financial burden on states against the will of the elected officials of the states, the president had violated the Guarantee Clause of the Constitution — which guarantees a representative form of government in the states, not one in which a federal official can tell state officials how to spend state tax dollars.

It also ruled that by enforcing his executive orders instead of the laws as Congress wrote them — those laws mandate deportation for all who came here illegally, no matter their age or family status — the president was failing to take care that all federal laws be enforced. That behavior, the court ruled, violated the Take Care Clause of the Constitution, which compels the president to enforce federal laws as they were written, not as he might wish them to be.

The Supreme Court declined to intervene by a 4-4 vote, thereby permitting the 5th Circuit decision to stand undisturbed.

When Sessions announced this week that DACA will not be followed after March 5, 2018, he said he is confident that DACA is unconstitutional for the same reasons that the courts found DAPA to be unconstitutional. Yet there are moral, constitutional, legal and economic arguments on this that will be an obstacle to the cancellation of this long-standing program.

Morally, most of the beneficiaries of DACA are fully Americanized young adults who know no other life but what they have here and have no roots in the countries of their births. Many are serving the U.S. in the military.

Constitutionally, DACA has effectively been in place since 1986, and 800,000 people younger than 40 have planned their lives in reliance upon it. Legally, once a benefit has been given by the government and relied upon, the courts are reluctant to rescind it, even though the 5th Circuit showed no such reluctance.

Economically, the summary removal of more than three-quarters of a million people from the workforce would have serious negative consequences for their employers and dependents and for delicate economic forces, and there would be negative economic consequences to the government, as well, as each claimed hardship case — each person whose deportation is ordered — is entitled to a hearing at the government’s expense.

Now many Republican and Democratic lawmakers in Congress want to make a close version of Obama’s executive orders with respect to immigrant infants (DACA) the law of the land — something they declined to do when Obama was president. Were this to happen, the tables would be turned on Trump. He would be confronted with the constitutional duty of enforcing a federal law that he has condemned.

Andrew P. Napolitano, a former judge of the Superior Court of New Jersey, is the senior judicial analyst at Fox News Channel.

breaks another record, becoming first Atlantic hurricane to maintain 185mph winds for 24 hours | The Independent

breaks another record, becoming first Atlantic hurricane to maintain 185mph winds for 24 hours | The Independent

Hurricane Irma has set another record, having sustained max wind speeds of 185 miles per hour for more than 24 hours – so becoming the only Atlantic hurricane to sustain that powerful wind speed for so long.

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The last hurricane is maintain such winds for even close to that long was hurricane Allen, which hit northern Mexico and southern Texas in 1980. Allen had winds of 180 mph and above for around 18 hours. The top wind speed for Allen was 190 mph.

Irma has clobbered Caribbean islands with pounding winds, rain and surging surf on Wednesday as officials in Florida called for evacuations ahead of the storm’s expected landfall there this weekend.

Irma could become the second powerful storm to thrash the US mainland in as many weeks, but its precise trajectory remained uncertain. Hurricane Harvey killed about 60 people and caused as much as $180 billion in damage after hitting Texas late last month.

Latest updates on hurricane Irma in our live blog

The eye of Irma was passing over the northernmost Virgin Islands on Wednesday afternoon after crossing the half-French, half-Dutch island of St. Martin, the US National Hurricane Center said. Category 5 is its highest category.

On its current path the core of Irma, which the Miami-based centre said was the strongest Atlantic storm on record, was expected to pass near or just north of Puerto Rico on Wednesday before scraping the north coast of the Dominican Republic on Thursday.

Karel van Oosterom, the Netherlands ambassador to the United Nations, said Irma had hit the Dutch islands of Saba and Sint Eustasius before overrunning St. Martin.

“First information indicates that a lot of damage has been done, but communication is still extremely difficult,” he said at a UN meeting.

Hurricane Irma – in pictures

· 18 show all

Hurricane Irma – in pictures

· 1/18

A tree collapsed on a house in St Martin

· 2/18

A hotel in Saint Martin is gutted by floodwater during the hurricane

Guadeloupe 1ère

· 3/18

Cars submerged in Saint Martin

Rinsy Xieng

· 4/18

Debris floats amongst the floodwater in Saint Martin

@la1ere

· 5/18

Household items float down the street in Gustavia, Saint-Barthélemy

Carole Greaux

· 6/18

The coast of St Martin is flooded as the hurricane hits the island

Météo Express

· 7/18

A whole street underwater in Saint Martin

@la1ere

· 8/18

A car crashes into the tree amongst the chaos in Saint Martin

@Bondtehond

· 9/18

A building on the St Martin seafront, destroyed by the hurricane

@Bondtehond

· 10/18

@Bondtehond

· 11/18

Palm trees bend in the wind in San Juan, Puerto Rico as Hurricane Irma slammed across islands in the northern Caribbean

Reuters/Alvin Baez

· 12/18

A woman runs in the rain as Hurricane Irma slammed into San Juan, Puerto Rico

Reuters/Alvin Baez

· 13/18

A picture taken on September 5, 2017 shows a view of the Baie Nettle beach in Marigot, with the wind blowing ahead of the arrival of Hurricane Irma

AFP/Getty Images

· 14/18

A man rides past a boarded up house as part of preparations ahead of the arrival of Hurricane Irma on September 5, 2017, in the French overseas island of Guadeloupe

Helene Valenzuela/AFP

· 15/18

Employees of the Mercure Hotel fill sand bags on the Baie Nettle beach in Marigot, as part of the preparations for the arrival of Hurricane Irma

Lionel Chamoiseau/AFP

· 16/18

People in line at Costco, as they find out the store has ran out of water on September 5, 2017 in North Miami

Michele Eve Sandberg/AFP

· 17/18

Night view of the city of Cap-Haitien, in the north of Haiti, 240 km from Port-au-Prince, on September 5, 2017

Hector Retamal/AFP

· 18/18

Bonjour Food Market in Miami prepares for Hurricane Irma

Michele Eve Sandberg/AFP

Irma began lashing Puerto Rico with rain at mid-morning. Governor Ricardo Rossello told residents to stay inside as the storm bore down on the island. “There is no reason to be in the street,” Mr Rossello told a midday press conference.

Many businesses in the capital San Juan were closed and many buildings were covered with storm shutters. Occasional shoppers were out making final purchases of water, ice and food to prepare for what could be several days without power.

Rene Franco, a 37-year-old medical student, said he had still not decided whether to flee to a shelter.

“I feel ready. I bought groceries. I bought water — too much water,” he said as he walked his 12-year-old dog Heaven before the storm arrived. “In the past I have always stayed in my house but this time it depends. It depends on the waves and the water. This is a very difficult storm.”

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Related video: Dramatic footage as NOAA plane flies into Irma

After Irma battered the island nation of Antigua and Barbuda, emergency officials reported three injuries and minimal damage, with some roofs blown off. Prime Minister Gaston Browne said flights would resume from the airport Wednesday afternoon.

Many of the Caribbean’s Leeward Islands were under a hurricane watch, including the Turks and Caicos Islands and the southeastern Bahamas, the NHC said.

In Paris, the French government said it had delivered water and food to two overseas territories, St. Martin and St. Barthelemy, and that emergency response teams would be sent once the storm had passed.

Power was knocked out on both islands, according to prefecture officials on Guadeloupe. At least four buildings were damaged and low-lying regions had been flooded, French Interior Minister Gerard Collomb said.

The UN World Food Programme prepared to provide emergency aid to Haiti if it was hit by Irma. The country was ravaged by a 2010 earthquake and Hurricane Matthew last year.

US President Donald Trump said he and aides were monitoring Irma’s progress. “But it looks like it could be something that will be not good. Believe me, not good,” he told reporters at the White House.

Mr Trump, whose Mar-a-Lago estate in Palm Beach, Florida, could take a direct hit from the storm, has already approved emergency declarations for Florida, Puerto Rico and the US Virgin Islands, mobilising federal disaster relief efforts.

Florida Governor Rick Scott said Irma could be more devastating than Hurricane Andrew, a Category 5 storm that struck the state in 1992 and still ranks as one of the costliest ever in the United States.

Residents of the Florida Keys, a resort archipelago at the state’s southern tip, were ordered to leave by Wednesday evening. Residents of low-lying areas in densely populated Miami-Dade County were urged to move to higher ground.

“We can expect additional evacuations as this storm continues to come near our state,” Scott said at a news conference in the Keys.

He said 7,000 National Guard troops would report for duty on Friday, ahead of the storm’s expected arrival.

In South Carolina, Governor Henry McMaster also declared a state of emergency and urged residents to prepare for Irma’s potential landfall there.

“It’s too soon to rule out any possibilities,” said Kim Stenson, director of the South Carolina Emergency Management Division. “Hurricane Irma is a dangerous storm and its projected path could put South Carolina in harm’s way. Fortunately, people in South Carolina have time.”

Reuters contributed to this report

· More about:

· Hurricane Irma

Thursday, September 7, 2017

8:44 AM

Who shot and mortally wounded President William B. McKinley on this day in 1901?

Question : Who shot and mortally wounded President William B. McKinley on this day in 1901?

Options:
John Wilkes Booth
Sirhan Sirhan
Leon F. Czolgosz
Jack Leon Ruby

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.brainyexam.thinktrivia&hl=en%C2%A0

Answer:

Leon F. Czolgosz

On September 6, 1901, William McKinley, the 25th President of the United States, was shot on the grounds of the Pan-American Exposition at the Temple of Music in Buffalo, New York. McKinley was shaking hands with the public when Leon Czolgosz, an anarchist, shot him twice in the abdomen. McKinley died eight days later of an infection which had spread from that wound. He was the third American president to have been assassinated, following Abraham Lincoln in 1865 and James A. Garfield in 1881. Czolgosz was executed just over seven weeks later.

American Horror Story Season 7 Episode 1 Review – AHS Cult “Election Night” Recap

American Horror Story Season 7 Episode 1 Review – AHS Cult "Election Night" Recap

Wednesday, September 6, 2017

3:06 PM

Playstore Android Link: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.brainyexam.thinktrivia&hl=en

"There is nothing more dangerous in this world than a humiliated man."

Frank Ockenfels/FX

Even though Ryan Murphy claimed American Horror Story: Cult would be about the 2016 election, every trailer and video clip leading up to its release featured knife-wielding clowns, ominous people in hazmat suits, and creepy bugs. But the first episode proved that Donald Trump’s win in the November 2016 election is instrumental to the new season of Ryan Murphy’s show. From the characters’ disparate reactions to the horror movie events which occur in the wake of Trump’s win, the election is AHS: Cult‘s inspiration, and that’s exactly why the first episode is so scary.

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Here’s everything we learned from the premiere:

1) AHS: Cult is very much set in our world, right now.

The episode opens with real-life footage of Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton during their respective campaigns. The news clips end with Clinton saying, "You can’t just say whatever pops into your head if you want to be the president of the United States of America." While Trump has disproven this theory on multiple occasions, it’s an indication that the shock and disbelief Clinton voters have felt since election night is this season’s inspiration. A reporter says onscreen, "There is a real, palpable fear out there today," and it’s this instability that sets the mood for the rest of the episode.

2) This season follows two very different factions.

Sarah Paulson’s Ally stares in disbelief at the television as Clinton concedes the race. Meanwhile, in a basement elsewhere, Evan Peters’ Kai announces that "the revolution has begun," and proceeds to aggressively thrust his body against the television. Even if AHS: Cult manifests its horror in clown-like murderers, it seems its purpose is to show the tension between Clinton and Trump supporters.

3) Evan Peters’ Kai, this season’s antagonist, models himself on Trump.

Aside from humping the TV screen when the winner is announced, Kai attempts to physically emulate Trump in a very specific way: by putting cheese puffs into a blender and rubbing them all over his face to get the president’s orange glow. He also styles his hair into Trump’s signauture quiff. The look (in all its horror) is complete.

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4) Billie Lourd’s Winter lives with Kai but has very different politics.

Hearing the news that Trump is president, Winter asks a friend over the phone, "What if I get pregnant now? Where will I get an abortion?" Her concerns are the concerns of women all over the country. However, despite having an allegiance to Clinton, Winter lives with Kai, and as the episode progresses, it becomes clear that she might not be immune to committing acts of violence.

5) Twisty is back, but not in the flesh—yet.

As the trailer already revealed, AHS: Freak Show‘s Twisty is back, but only in comic book form. Though he appears in a slasher-esque scene and murders a couple who are about to have sex, it turns out that Ozzy, Ally and Ivy’s kid, is just reading a comic book about Twisty and imagining the story in his head.

However, as clowns appear to roam the streets post-election, it wouldn’t be surprising if the real Twisty appeared…

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6) This season is about "trigger warnings," and the lack of them.

Ozzy’s Twisty comic book triggers his mom’s coulrophobia. When Ozzy has night terrors, Ally is concerned. "My phobias are starting to affect our son," she says. But clowns aren’t her only worry; she tells her therapist she also hates "confined spaces, the blood particles in the air, the dark, that coral thing that’s been staring at me since I came in here."

When Winter announces that CNN should have had a trigger warning before calling the election results, it’s an important pre-cursor to the season. Some horrors we can’t avoid—particularly in a post-election world we have zero control over.

7) Mediocre white men are the most terrifying monsters of all.

In a town council meeting, Kai suggests having less police officers on the streets is better—a way to encourage a society of fear. In response to his outlandish requests, Ally’s friend Councillor Chang says, "I appreciate that a lot of you 4chan guys feel empowered to join the rest of us in civil society now that papa bear Trump is telling you it’s okay. But let me send you a message: This is a blip." His words are eerily resonant given the events of Charlottesville just a few weeks ago.

Kai’s response is key: "There is nothing more dangerous in this world than a humiliated man."

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8) Cheyenne Jackson is Ally’s ridiculously good-looking therapist.

His name is Dr. Vincent, and he’s suspicious for three reasons:

1) He gives her medication for her anxiety. In the real world, this would be a totally normal, non-suspect thing for a doctor to do. However, in American Horror Story, this might be an example of sinister behavior (remember the Addiction Demon from Hotel?). And when the doctor is kind of hot, it’s even more suspicious.

2) When Dr. Vincent recommends that Ally work out, as that’s how he’s been dealing with the political upheaval, Ally takes a closer look at his body. There’s a totally flirty moment, in which she remarks, "You do look good." Ally is happily married to her wife, Ivy, but could an affair be on the horizon?

3) Dr. Vincent knows all of Ally’s phobias. Has he been feeding this information to whoever is responsible for the clowns that keep appearing?

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9) Ally’s coulrophobia manifests in an intensely creepy way.

In the supermarket, the cashier’s "Make America Great Again" cap starts a chain reaction. Ally sees two clowns having sex on the watermelons in the produce section. A man wearing a mask with three faces and riding a scooter chases her down. From the car, she calls her wife Ivy, but as the camera pans, it’s clear a masked creature is sitting on the back seat. In reaction, she crashes her car. Still, no one believes her.

"They knew my fears. They wanted to murder me," Ally says, adding weight to the theory that someone she knows is deliberately sabotaging her life.

10) Ally didn’t vote for Hillary.

She thanks her wife for not telling anyone that she didn’t vote for Hillary, but her choice to vote for an independent is clearly a major source of contention.

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11) Winter might be the nanny from hell.

After revealing to Kai that she hates children, Winter applies for the job as Ozzy’s nanny and is hired almost immediately. She’s also terrified of Kai, and he might be the reason she’s taken the job. Later on in the episode, she shows Ozzy snuff videos on the Dark Web. It’s clear she’s about to cause trouble for Ally and Ivy’s family.

It’s also worth noting that her surname is Richards, while Ally and Ivy share the surname Mayfair-Richards. Could she be a relation?

12) There was a Lena Dunham shout-out ahead of her appearance in the season.

Winter proclaims, "My proudest moment was when Lena Dunham retweeted me," regarding her work on the Clinton campaign. Dunham will appear later in the season, as Valerie Solanas, the woman who made an assassination attempt on Andy Warhol.

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13) Winter doesn’t call the police when Ozzy witnesses a murder.

Instead, Winter takes Ozzy across the street and makes him look inside a house, where he witnesses a group of clowns murdering Councillor Chang (who wronged Kai earlier in the episode) and his wife. Winter tells the police and his moms that Ozzy imagined the clowns. Is she just covering for them?

Detective Samuels, played by Colton Haynes, rules the crime a murder-suicide. Is he in on the crime, too?

14) Ivy might be gaslighting Ally.

When Ally sees a clown masturbating in the restaurant, Ivy is short with her, and requests that she starts taking her medication. She blames Ally for their dwindling sex life, and she gently, on several occasions, suggests that Ally is ruining their family. Is she gaslighting Ally, a nod to the way the term went viral following Trump’s election?

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Clearly, American Horror Story: Cult is going to be filled with references to the election, but it’s going to be every bit as gory and twisty, as every other season of the show so far. Stay tuned for more mayhem.

Review in progress: Destiny 2 is ready to take over your life again | Metro News

Review in progress: Destiny 2 is ready to take over your life again | Metro News

Wednesday, September 6, 2017

11:42 AM

Playstore Android Link: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.brainyexam.thinktrivia&hl=en

Destiny 2 – the launch is only the start

GameCentral takes a look at the opening hours of Bungie’s mega sequel, including the story campaign and co-op play.

It was obvious from the moment it was announced that Destiny 2 wouldn’t be doing anything fundamentally different to its predecessor. Despite its enormous success the first Destiny earned a mixed reception upon its launch and was heavily criticised throughout its lifetime, even and especially by those that dedicated dozens of hours a week to playing it.

So while the sequel may seem unambitious, and relatively miserly in terms of new features, it will still prove more than worthwhile if it manages to streamline the original experience and add more content. And judging by the opening hours alone, it seems to have done exactly that.

As with any online-only game there was no way to properly review Destiny 2 before launch, especially considering that the first raid doesn’t go live until next Wednesday evening. The rest of the game switched on yesterday, at around 1pm in the UK, ahead of the official midnight launch. How smoothly that goes we’ll have to wait and see, but there were no major problems with the first one and the Destiny 2 beta seemed to go well.

The other problem with reviewing Destiny 2 is that we’ve already played the opening campaign level twice now, and you’ve probably watched it even more times via the official gameplay videos (not to mention all the streamers that leap upon the game the second the severs went live). But as overfamiliar as the opening has already become it is still a useful statement on just what developer Bungie is trying to achieve with Destiny 2.

Their stated priorities are improved storytelling, given there was almost none in the original; expansion, particularly of the open world patrol zones; and reinvention of flawed elements such as character progression and the competitive multiplayer.

Considering developer Bungie was previously best known as the creator of Halo it always seemed bizarre that Destiny never featured any coherent plot or characters, but the new campaign is almost falling over itself trying to rectify that oversight. The thrust of the story is that Earth has been invaded by a new faction of Cabal invaders, who destroy the Citadel and rob all Guardians of their ability to use Light. In other words they press the reset button on everyone’s character, so every player has to start again from scratch.

All of this is illustrated by much more structured set pieces than before, that immediately feel a lot more like Halo than anything in Destiny 1. The plot and characters are fairly bog standard sci-fi clichés though, where everyone is either a wannabe comedian (Cayde-6 is already almost unbearable) or stoic hardass whose every utterance seems more portentous than the last. There’s a certain sense of desperation in the game’s attempts to add more personality to its world, and while that’s preferable to nothing at all it hasn’t really grabbed us so far.

Destiny 2 – not exactly what you’d call all-new

Where Destiny 2 shows unequivocal improvement though is in its open world areas. These were always impressively large but also largely empty – with only some dull fetch quests and the occasional public event to liven things up. Destiny 2 adds two important new aspects in the form of Adventures and Lost Sectors. Adventures are basically proper side quests, with not only more varied objectives but also more snippets of storytelling and characterisation. Which come across as a lot less heavy-handed than the main campaign.

Lost Sectors have been billed as the first person shooter equivalent of a dungeon crawler, although they’re a little underwhelming so far in terms of size and loot harvest. They’re hidden in plain sight in the open world, and you can replay them as often as you want, but they’re not very difficult and basically just involve wiping out every bad guy in the area.

But of course the main appeal of Destiny, and the real reason for its success, is playing with other people. Something that’s not emphasised by the campaign but has become increasingly important for the open world areas. As a result public events have evolved from the simplistic boss battles of the first game into much more complicated group activities, with multiple objectives – including a hidden one that unlocks a higher difficulty version of the event.

The simplest way to play co-op remains a strike, which so far seems to be the least altered element of the game. Although raids will now have a kind of matchmaking, in the form of the guided games option. What has seen significant change though is the Crucible’s competitive multiplayer. Every play mode is now limited to four vs. four, and one of the main new ones uses Counter-Strike for inspiration, as you alternately try to plant a bomb and defuse it.

Destiny 2 – are you ready to get addicted all over again?

The Crucible was always the least distinctive part of Destiny’s design but the new Survival mode is an interesting new addition, in that you have to share respawns with your team and once you run out you can’t rejoin the match. We’re not sure the lowered player count was really necessary to make that work, but it’s fun nonetheless.

The nuances of Destiny 2’s new modes and options will become clearer over the coming days but it’s the little improvements that are going to be most obvious when you first start. Like the fact that the open worlds now have a proper in-game map, that lets you track public events, add waypoints, and use fast travel. Things that seem blindingly obvious now, but for some reason were never in the original game.

There’s a long list of reasons to be disappointed by Destiny 2. There are no completely new races, relatively few new worlds, and little change to the types of weapons available – even if they have all been recategorised. There’s no new class types either, just new subclasses that are sadly lacking in any real kind of novelty.

It’s not hard to imagine a much more ambitious version of Destiny 2, but it’s also hard to deny that the mixture of perfectly tuned action and endless loot farming works just as well as ever. Destiny 2 is a refinement, not a revolution, but everyone knew that months ago. And if you weren’t put off by that prospect before you certainly won’t be once you get your hands on the final game.

Formats: PlayStation 4 (reviewed), Xbox One, and PC
Price: £54.99
Publisher: Activision
Developer: Bungie
Release Date: 6th September 2017 (24/10 on PC)
Age Rating: 16

Email gamecentral@ukmetro.co.uk, leave a comment below, and follow us on Twitter

Review in progress: Destiny 2 is ready to take over your life again | Metro News

Review in progress: Destiny 2 is ready to take over your life again | Metro News

Wednesday, September 6, 2017

11:42 AM

Playstore Android Link: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.brainyexam.thinktrivia&hl=en

Destiny 2 – the launch is only the start

GameCentral takes a look at the opening hours of Bungie’s mega sequel, including the story campaign and co-op play.

It was obvious from the moment it was announced that Destiny 2 wouldn’t be doing anything fundamentally different to its predecessor. Despite its enormous success the first Destiny earned a mixed reception upon its launch and was heavily criticised throughout its lifetime, even and especially by those that dedicated dozens of hours a week to playing it.

So while the sequel may seem unambitious, and relatively miserly in terms of new features, it will still prove more than worthwhile if it manages to streamline the original experience and add more content. And judging by the opening hours alone, it seems to have done exactly that.

As with any online-only game there was no way to properly review Destiny 2 before launch, especially considering that the first raid doesn’t go live until next Wednesday evening. The rest of the game switched on yesterday, at around 1pm in the UK, ahead of the official midnight launch. How smoothly that goes we’ll have to wait and see, but there were no major problems with the first one and the Destiny 2 beta seemed to go well.

The other problem with reviewing Destiny 2 is that we’ve already played the opening campaign level twice now, and you’ve probably watched it even more times via the official gameplay videos (not to mention all the streamers that leap upon the game the second the severs went live). But as overfamiliar as the opening has already become it is still a useful statement on just what developer Bungie is trying to achieve with Destiny 2.

Their stated priorities are improved storytelling, given there was almost none in the original; expansion, particularly of the open world patrol zones; and reinvention of flawed elements such as character progression and the competitive multiplayer.

Considering developer Bungie was previously best known as the creator of Halo it always seemed bizarre that Destiny never featured any coherent plot or characters, but the new campaign is almost falling over itself trying to rectify that oversight. The thrust of the story is that Earth has been invaded by a new faction of Cabal invaders, who destroy the Citadel and rob all Guardians of their ability to use Light. In other words they press the reset button on everyone’s character, so every player has to start again from scratch.

All of this is illustrated by much more structured set pieces than before, that immediately feel a lot more like Halo than anything in Destiny 1. The plot and characters are fairly bog standard sci-fi clichés though, where everyone is either a wannabe comedian (Cayde-6 is already almost unbearable) or stoic hardass whose every utterance seems more portentous than the last. There’s a certain sense of desperation in the game’s attempts to add more personality to its world, and while that’s preferable to nothing at all it hasn’t really grabbed us so far.

Destiny 2 – not exactly what you’d call all-new

Where Destiny 2 shows unequivocal improvement though is in its open world areas. These were always impressively large but also largely empty – with only some dull fetch quests and the occasional public event to liven things up. Destiny 2 adds two important new aspects in the form of Adventures and Lost Sectors. Adventures are basically proper side quests, with not only more varied objectives but also more snippets of storytelling and characterisation. Which come across as a lot less heavy-handed than the main campaign.

Lost Sectors have been billed as the first person shooter equivalent of a dungeon crawler, although they’re a little underwhelming so far in terms of size and loot harvest. They’re hidden in plain sight in the open world, and you can replay them as often as you want, but they’re not very difficult and basically just involve wiping out every bad guy in the area.

But of course the main appeal of Destiny, and the real reason for its success, is playing with other people. Something that’s not emphasised by the campaign but has become increasingly important for the open world areas. As a result public events have evolved from the simplistic boss battles of the first game into much more complicated group activities, with multiple objectives – including a hidden one that unlocks a higher difficulty version of the event.

The simplest way to play co-op remains a strike, which so far seems to be the least altered element of the game. Although raids will now have a kind of matchmaking, in the form of the guided games option. What has seen significant change though is the Crucible’s competitive multiplayer. Every play mode is now limited to four vs. four, and one of the main new ones uses Counter-Strike for inspiration, as you alternately try to plant a bomb and defuse it.

Destiny 2 – are you ready to get addicted all over again?

The Crucible was always the least distinctive part of Destiny’s design but the new Survival mode is an interesting new addition, in that you have to share respawns with your team and once you run out you can’t rejoin the match. We’re not sure the lowered player count was really necessary to make that work, but it’s fun nonetheless.

The nuances of Destiny 2’s new modes and options will become clearer over the coming days but it’s the little improvements that are going to be most obvious when you first start. Like the fact that the open worlds now have a proper in-game map, that lets you track public events, add waypoints, and use fast travel. Things that seem blindingly obvious now, but for some reason were never in the original game.

There’s a long list of reasons to be disappointed by Destiny 2. There are no completely new races, relatively few new worlds, and little change to the types of weapons available – even if they have all been recategorised. There’s no new class types either, just new subclasses that are sadly lacking in any real kind of novelty.

It’s not hard to imagine a much more ambitious version of Destiny 2, but it’s also hard to deny that the mixture of perfectly tuned action and endless loot farming works just as well as ever. Destiny 2 is a refinement, not a revolution, but everyone knew that months ago. And if you weren’t put off by that prospect before you certainly won’t be once you get your hands on the final game.

Formats: PlayStation 4 (reviewed), Xbox One, and PC
Price: £54.99
Publisher: Activision
Developer: Bungie
Release Date: 6th September 2017 (24/10 on PC)
Age Rating: 16

Email gamecentral@ukmetro.co.uk, leave a comment below, and follow us on Twitter

Poppy Delevingne flaunts her ample cleavage at GQ Awards | Daily Mail Online

Poppy Delevingne flaunts her ample cleavage at GQ Awards | Daily Mail Online

Wednesday, September 6, 2017

8:56 AM

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It’s one of the most illustrious awards ceremonies of the year in the British event calendar, drawing in the biggest names in fashion, music and film to the Tate Modern.

And leading the head-turning style at the GQ Men of the Year Awards 2017 was Poppy Delevingne, 31, Anna Friel, 41, and Jourdan Dunn, 27, in equally figure-flaunting ensembles for the exclusive bash in London on Tuesday night.

In its 20th year, model-turned-actress Poppy was sure to command attention in her sheer haute couture Reem Acra gown which managed to barely cover her modesty with a number of embroidered stars across the chiffon bodice.

Scroll down for video

The full-length number attempted to deter attention from her bust with its high-neck silhouette and frill-detailed sleeves which added to the Gothic vibe of the ensemble as she made her way up the carpet alongside Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn.

Offsetting the sheer fabric, her skirt flared to the ground in a sea of grey and black tulle with matching ruffle accents and star embroidery.

Having narrowly missed out on completely freeing the nipple, Poppy – who made her acting debut in Guy Ritchie’s King Arthur: Legend of the Sword – continued her skin-flashing display as she showcased her high-waisted black underwear.

Teaming the look with a matching black clutch, the blonde beauty balanced her dramatic ensemble by styling her hair behind her ears to display her fetching drop-earrings.

British actress Anna was sure to lead the fashion charge in her striking semi-sheer lurex Dhela gown which showcased her sensational frame as she stopped for photos along the carpet.

The richly coloured number – which featured hues of purple, maroon, gold, navy and hot pink – oozed seventies vibes as she cascaded to the ground while the fabric gave a glimpse to the silhouette of her undergarments and slender pins.

Stylishly pushing her sleeves, Anna’s retro-inspired dress boasted a plunging neckline which accentuated her ample cleavage and decollatage.

While she highlighted her narrow waist with a eye-catching hot pink belt that wrapped around her petite figure.

The Marcella star added inches to her diminutive height with a pair of platform heels, opting to forgo accessorises for the evening and letting her striking dress do the talking.

Anna finished her head-turning number with a slick of vibrant red lipstick and styled her tresses into a loose chignon while her fringe famed her face.

Elsewhere, supermodel Jourdan Dunn, 27, looked sensational in a strapless velvet black gown which highlighted her enviable figure for the star-studded evening.

Pin-up worthy, the striking fashion star’s sweetheart neckline ensemble complemented her flowing raven locks and strappy stiletto.

Echoing her stylish display, Hole frontwoman Courtney was every inch old Hollywood glamour in her mint-hued slinky number.

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The famed rocker poured her womanly curves into the silk full-length gown which skimmed her figure in all the right places while she worked her way up the carpet.

Courtney’s bardot-inspired dress featured thick shoulder straps before wrapping around her back into a caplet that fell stylishly to her pert derriere.

Putting her own twist on her chic look, she carried a snakeskin clutch up the carpet while she decorated her neck with a simple silver chain.

She added to her jewellery display with a number of bangles around her wrist and offset her manicure with an onyx ring.

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Storm Keating proved she’d had no problems snapping straight back to her pre-pregnancy weight as she attended the awards.

Showing off her sensational figure in a sheer black gown, the 35-year-old model dazzled as she walked the red carpet with her husband Ronan.

Flaunting every inch of her incredible physique, the blonde bombshell donned an entirely sheer gown with lace panels over her underwear.

Ensuring she didn’t flash too much, Storm – who was named Sharyn by her parents for fear ‘people might make fun of her growing up’ – donned a pair of high-waisted briefs to protect her modesty with her skimpy bra.

Wearing her golden locks in loose waves, Storm sizzled as she cuddled up to Ronan – who looked dapper in a tuxedo.

Turning the style brigade’s attention to the men, Jared Leto, 45, didn’t disappoint as he made a showstopping entrance to the awards, donning a flamboyant scarlet tweed suit for his turn on the red carpet.

Adding a whimsical twist, the Oscar winner’s quirky Gucci outfit featured oversize ebony lapels, decorated with a vibrant floral print.

He paired the look with a red fitted shirt with a white collar and navy tie, with black brogues completing the stylish sartorial ensemble.

The stylish Dallas Buyers Club actor rocked a heavy beard and wore his chestnut locks swept away from his face into a stylish bun, drawing attention to his piercing blue eyes.

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Also making a dashing appearance at the celeb laden affair, was McFly rocker Dougie Poynter, 29, who looked typically handsome in an edgy teal suit, paired with an open-necked fitted black shirt.

His tousled blonde locks were worn in a stylish side parting and the star kept his trademark stoic expression as he posed for snappers.

The GQ Awards, now in its 20th year, celebrates more than 400 men, and a selection of women, who excel in the fields of film, music, sport, TV, books, politics and more.

Last year former Leicester City manager Claudio Ranieri took home the coveted Outstanding Achievement award after he coached his team to Premier League glory.

This year’s glittering event, held in London’s Southbank will be hosted by acclaimed actor Mark Strong, who has starred in The Imitation Game, ZeroDarkThirty and RocknRolla.

The highly coveted goody bags for guests include a bottle of whiskey from event sponsor Copperdog, L’Oreal moisturiser and a £500 PrivateFly discount voucher while winners will receive luxuries including a hotel stay, a monogrammed scarf from award sponsor Hugo Boss and a spa treatment.

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The Watergate Story | Deep Throat Revealed – The Washington Post

The Watergate Story | Deep Throat Revealed – The Washington Post

Tuesday, September 5, 2017

9:30 AM

Playstore Android Link: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.brainyexam.thinktrivia&hl=en

Part 4

On May 31, 2005 one of Washington’s best-kept secrets was revealed.

Vanity Fair magazine identified a former top FBI official named Mark Felt as Deep Throat, the secret source high in the U.S. government who helped Post reporters Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein unravel the Watergate conspiracy. Woodward, Bernstein and the paper’s editors confirmed the story.

"Felt’s identity as Washington’s most celebrated secret source had been an object of speculation for more than 30 years," wrote Post reporter David Von Drehle the next day.

VIDEO | Bob Woodward discusses the revelation of Deep Throat’s identity.

The reporters had written about their trusted source in their best-selling 1974 book, "All the President’s Men," and the 1975 movie of the same name dramatized his sometimes cryptic advice about how pursue the connection between the Nixon White House and a crew of seven burglars caught in the offices of the Democratic National Committee on the night of June 17, 1972. His true identity, the object of "countless guesses" over the years, remained secret until Vanity Fair’s story. "I’m the guy they call Deep Throat," Felt told members of his family.

The day after the story broke, Woodward wrote a first person account of his relationship with Felt, which began with a chance encounter between a junior naval officer and a wary bureaucrat in 1970. Woodward cultivated him as a source. When the Post began to pursue the Watergate story, Woodward relied on Felt for guidance.

In May 2005 Vanity Fair magazine revealed that Mark Felt, pictured above with his daughter, was the source referred to ad "Deep Throat." The former No. 2 official at the FBI secretly confirmed to Woodward and Bernstein what they discovered from other sources in reporting on the cover-up. (AP)

"I was thankful for any morsel or information, confirmation or assistance Felt gave me while Carl and I were attempting to understand the many-headed monster of Watergate. Because of his position virtually atop the chief investigative agency, his words and guidance had immense, at times even staggering, authority," Woodward wrote.

But as The Post noted, Woodward and Bernstein also "expressed a concern that the Deep Throat story has, over the years, come to obscure the many other elements that went into exposing the Watergate story: other sources, other investigators, high-impact Senate hearings, a shocking trove of secret White House tape recordings and the decisive intervention of a unanimous U.S. Supreme Court."

"Felt’s role in all this can be overstated," said Bernstein, who went on after Watergate to a career of books, magazine articles and television investigations. "When we wrote the book, we didn’t think his role would achieve such mythical dimensions. You see there that Felt/Deep Throat largely confirmed information we had already gotten from other sources."

From Part 4: WOODWARD ON DEEP THROAT (video) | WATERGATE AND THE TWO LIVES OF MARK FELT (story) | FROM OUTLOOK: "ALL THE BUREAUCRACY’S MEN" (story) | POST’S BEN BRADLEE ON DEEP THROAT (Video) | MARK FELT AND WATERGATE (timeline) | WOODWARD’S NOTES FROM MEETINGS WITH DEEP THROAT (online)

Which member of the “The Monkees” was from Houston, Texas?

Question :

Which member of the "The Monkees" was from Houston,\Texas?

Options:

  1. Davy Jones
  2. Mike Nesmith
  3. Peter Tork
  4. Mickey Dolenz

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.brainyexam.thinktrivia&hl=en%C2%A0

Answer:

Mike Nesmith

Mike Nesmith was born in Houston, Texas in December 1942. After a two-year stint in the Air Force, Nesmith attended San Antonio College, where he started recording and performing his own music compositions. In 1965, he won a role on a new television series about a rock band called "The Monkees." Their music reached the top of the pop charts with hits like "I’m A Believer" and "Last Train to Clarksville." Source: Biography.com